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Scion Sources For 2022
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DanielW
Clark County, WA
518 Posts
(Offline)
1
November 15, 2021 - 7:31 am

With the loss of Home Orchard Society scion fair, I was thinking about scion sources.  They do not replace the sense of community, exchange of ideas, and excitement of sharing at a scion fair, or the number of choices.   However, it is what it is.

I like the Fedco scion list for the descriptions.  Scion is $5 a stick.  They are located in Maine, and focus especially on heritage Maine varieties, varieties that do well there, and newer disease resistant varieties.  My Goldrush, Otterson, Jonathan, Porter, Gala, Honeycrisp, Milo Gibson, Sweet-16 scions all came from Fedco.  Their selections vary each year.    All of my Fedco scions have been good, although I've had a few small ones (Otterson) that I had to cleft graft because it was too small to whip and tongue graft.  I like their overall philosophy, think they would fit in in Oregon 30 years ago.

Fedco Scion

I've also bought scion from Burnt Ridge.  Their scion wood is $5 a foot.  Their list is more extensive than Fedco.  I've only bought chestnut scion from them.  It all took and grew well, and dome bloomed the first year.  They are a family owned nursery in WA State.  

Burnt Ridge Scion

I really, really don't need to add more trees.  I'm also doing more extensive pruning this year to make my trees more manageable and less deer friendly, and actually reduce the fruit load.  However, part of me can't help wanting to continue my late winter grafting tradition (always grateful to Jafar for instructing at HOS propagation fair about 11 years ago).  My thoughts at the moment are, from Fedco, Opalescent, Mutsu, Golden Russet, Freedom, Frostbite.  Some might be used for multigraft espalier, some for existing multigraft trees.

(as an off topic question on my own topic 😀, are russeted apples less susceptible to apple maggot or coddling moth?  That might affect my order)

I know there are other sources too.  I have had good success with these.

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davem
297 Posts
(Offline)
2
November 16, 2021 - 1:57 pm

Re: susceptibility to pests, in my experience the hardness of the fruit makes the most difference.  i.e. fruit that ripens late or is just more dense, has a LOT less damage from insects and birds.  But with late-ripening fruit there is always the risk that cool weather will arrive before it is fully ripe.

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JeanW
23 Posts
(Offline)
3
November 16, 2021 - 3:30 pm

Peninsula Fruit Club will hold our annual Spring Grafting Show on March 19, 2022, at the West Side Improvement Club, 4109 West E St, Bremerton, WA from 10 to 4.  We normally have about 350-400 different apple scions, probably 75 pears, and some plums, kiwis, and grapes.  Scion wood is $2.  Admission is free.

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jafar
549 Posts
(Offline)
4
November 16, 2021 - 3:52 pm

Temperate Orchard Conservancy and Home Orchard Education Center both sell scions - and if you have nostalgia for HOS, there are some familiar faces behind the scenes there.  Both non-profit.

http://www.temperateorchardcon.....vancy.org/

https://www.homeorchardeducati.....enter.org/

I've also had good experiences with Burnt Ridge in Washington and with Fruitwood Nursery in California.

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Reinettes
Lewis Co., WA
370 Posts
(Offline)
5
November 16, 2021 - 4:18 pm

Daniel,

The absence of the HOS "scion fair" is much to be missed.  There was always a fascinating diversity of cultivars that can be hard to acquire otherwise, if one were sufficiently aware of the rarity of certain varieties.  I'd occasionally be fascinated to find a rare variety that I didn't know to be in cultivation in the U.S., and of course I'd have to grab one while I could.  I suspect that those may have been from Nick Botner's personal collection.  God bless 'im.  He was not just a collector, but a connoisseur and, perhaps, may be worthy of sainthood for his efforts.  His collection has now been reproduced by the Temperate Orchard Conservancy (TOC).  I believe that scion wood requests can be made from the TOC starting on December 1st.  I'm not sure of the prices, but any money paid would certainly contribute to the collection's maintenance.  It forms an irreplaceable storehouse of varieties, some of which I can find no other source for.

If you "google around", you'll find a few apple sellers who offer scion wood for sale.  The selections tend to be fairly limited though depending on your preferences.

Another source is the National germplasm collection.  This should only be a last resort.  Apparently, too many people who graft their own plants will request scion wood of cultivars which are readily available in the trade.  The folks there don't appreciate that, and it's understandable.  The National germplasm collection should ONLY be used for varieties that have no other source.

I keep thinking that I need to write a letter of inquiry to the curator of the collection in Geneva, NY, to see whether they can import some scions of apple varieties that would do well in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. which do well in Great Britain.  At least for the present, those should do well in the PNW, although the Brits are also seeing the effects of global warming there, just as we are here.

I don't know whether this helps you at all, Daniel.  With the demise of the HOS, we are all apparently looking for "someone" who can fill that role that we so enjoyed in past years.

Reinettes.

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amiart
9 Posts
(Offline)
6
December 29, 2021 - 11:29 am

Source for Pacific Rose (Sciros)  Scion ?  anyone please have been looking for a very long time for this.

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jafar
549 Posts
(Offline)
7
December 29, 2021 - 5:47 pm

@amiart 

Apparently Pacific Rose is a trademark name for Sciros or Scirose variety.  It may be a club apple, so wood may not be available. But it should be off patent if you can find it.

Doesn't appear to be on the TOC scion list.  

Parents are Gala and Splendor:

https://extension.psu.edu/why-.....-varieties

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Reinettes
Lewis Co., WA
370 Posts
(Offline)
8
December 30, 2021 - 4:08 pm

Yes.  The dilemma of finding new sources for scions...

I didn't purchase very many rootstocks this year, given that I have the intention of propagating more of them myself.  Purchasing rootstocks each year adds up, and if I can stool my own from the rootstocks that I most like, all the better.  In the absence of the wonderful HOS scion assortment each March, I've been doing a lot of deliberating on what to acquire this year, and from whom.  I figure that I'll get perhaps 5 from the Temperate Orchard Conservancy.  The cost per scion is $6.00 and the shipping and handling is $10.00.  Seems a bit steep, but the TOC is a very worthy cause, and many of their clones cannot be acquired from any other source.  My "tastes" in apple varieties tends to be obscure, so the Botner/TOC collection is the way to go.

I also recently downloaded the list from Fedco Trees.  I was fascinated by the diversity of apple varieties that they have listed, but at the same time I felt that I didn't have enough knowledge about how apples from northern New England would perform here in the PNW.  Proper maturation of fruits is very important.  That's one of the reasons that I am very interested in apples from the British Isles.  It seems to me that those apples that do well there should also do well here in the PNW.

Trial and experimentation.  Without it, we don't gain new knowledge.  ...As Archie Bunker once said:  "Que seroo seroo." Smile

Reinettes.

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markshancock
Oregon
16 Posts
(Offline)
9
January 1, 2022 - 9:53 pm

I am new to grafting and live in the PNW (Portland Area).

Why do we need the HOS to do a local Scion Exchange?
Is all that is needed is a location?


Answers Post
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davem
297 Posts
(Offline)
10
January 2, 2022 - 4:40 pm

I'll be doing some pruning soon, here's a partial list of my apple varieties.  It is possible that I could be convinced to leave some scions out at the curb :-). 

I probably won't be pruning all of these, but I will be pruning many.  In this view, the parent tree is the column label and thus I will have tons of those scions, and a lesser amount for the varieties which I have grafted onto each.

Screenshot-2022-01-02-163327-1.jpg

I'm in SW Camas, 10 min from Hwy 14/192nd Ave.

Note that a few aren't well identified, e.g. "Fred Meyer Tree".

Here's a de-duped list:

Akane
Amere Forester
Braeburn
Calville Rouge of Autumn
Chehalis
Chisel Jersey
Court Pendu Plat
Cox's Orange Pippin
Dabinett
Davey
Enterprise
Florina
Fred Meyer Tree
Frequin Audievre
Fuji
Glockenapfel
Golden Russet (2)
Goldrush
Gravenstein
hey jack,
Honeycrisp
HP East (2) - one of the HP trees is Roxbury Russet
HP Middle - one of the HP trees is Roxbury Russet
HP West (2) - one of the HP trees is Roxbury Russet
Kandil Sinap
Kingston Black
MacFree
Miss Jessamine
Native Apple (Malus fusca)
Opal 1
Opal 2
Opal 3
Opal 5
Opal 6
Paula Red
Prima
Priscilla
Red Seedling
Sansa
Sir Prize
Steigerwald Lake NWR SW
Tsugaru
Tydeman's Red
Wheeler's Gold
Winter Banana (from yard)
Wolf River
Yellow Transparent
Zestar!

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Reinettes
Lewis Co., WA
370 Posts
(Offline)
11
January 3, 2022 - 7:46 pm

davem,

You have an intriguing list of varieties.  In the future, I may have to request something from you, given that you have several of the old traditional English and French cider apples grafted onto other trees (--I'm assuming that I'm reading your posting correctly).  If I understand your post, is 'Hey Jack' the only variety that you have so far grafted onto our native Malus fusca?  

I keep looking around my property at all the seedlings and saplings of Malus fusca [thoroughly native here] and wondering whether I should do some grafting with them.  In my observations, they seem to take at least a decade to reach flowering/fruiting maturity.  I keep thinking that I could use a monopodial one onto which I could graft a semi-dwarfing interstem, followed the next year by a Malus x domestica.  There are also other M. fusca saplings that I observe which were apparently "browsed" by either rabbits or deer in the seedling stage, and are now multi-stemmed... and I fantasize about grafting those various stems (--all from one rootstock--) back together and then using that base to use as a foundation for a dwarfing, or semi-dwarfing, interstock, topped with something I'd like.  Yes.  My mind wanders considerably.  

On your list, posted above, I can fairly confidently inform you that the correct name for 'Tydeman's Red' is, in England, 'Tydeman's early Worcester'.  I got it from HOS as a scion, but when it produced fruit it was a "dead-ringer" for T.E.W.  Apparently, it became known as 'Tydeman's Red' in British Columbia where it does well and is widely cultivated.  Needless to say, like many British apples, it does well in Cascadia.  When my 'Tydeman's Red' ripened its first fruits a couple of years ago, I couldn't believe just how yummy it was for -- basically -- a summer apple.  Most summer apples are profoundly inferior.

Well, that the news from this front. Smile

Reinettes.

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Rooney
Vancouver SW Washington
629 Posts
(Offline)
12
January 3, 2022 - 9:37 pm

DanielW said

I've also bought scion from Burnt Ridge.  Their scion wood is $5 a foot.  Their list is more extensive than Fedco.  I've only bought chestnut scion from them.  It all took and grew well, and dome bloomed the first year.  They are a family owned nursery in WA State. 

Burnt Ridge Scion

@ Daniel, I correctly aimed this scion source you listed to the proper place:

Burnt Ridge Scion

I noticed this little mistake while reviewing all other sources, which happens to be a pretty good source in Washington for us here. None have cherry wood so I today saved some of what I have from my 'regina' x 'attica' sweet cherry (ie. an okay random seedling), in case somebody here requests cherry.

The other option for cherry includes Purvis Nursery and Orchards in Idaho, very reputable online source.

I think what's happening is the price of full grown cherry trees are high due to shortages caused by farmers replacing trees that were previously infected with the little cherry virus.

@ John S, I saved the locally selected apricot wood you requested. It should be okay shape as it was sheltered with a glass open side roof. I have another selection from Idaho that I can't share the name of right now, and just wanted to tell you for now that Robert has this cultivar with unusual fruiting spurs all the way up to completely down to the thickest part of the trunk. I guess we may treat this as a "club apricot" some day -once permission (if ever) can be extended as such.

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davem
297 Posts
(Offline)
13
January 4, 2022 - 5:03 pm

Yes, you are correct.  Although my paperwork is a year behind my grafting, so there are many Ambrosia seedlings grafted onto it now.  But those won't be big enough to share for a while (assuming they end up being worth sharing).

You have an intriguing list of varieties.  In the future, I may have to request something from you, given that you have several of the old traditional English and French cider apples grafted onto other trees (--I'm assuming that I'm reading your posting correctly).  If I understand your post, is 'Hey Jack' the only variety that you have so far grafted onto our native Malus fusca?  

Good info about TEW.  Tydeman's Red must have been how it was labeled at the HOS event.

On your list, posted above, I can fairly confidently inform you that the correct name for 'Tydeman's Red' is, in England, 'Tydeman's early Worcester'.  I got it from HOS as a scion, but when it produced fruit it was a "dead-ringer" for T.E.W.  Apparently, it became known as 'Tydeman's Red' in British Columbia where it does well and is widely cultivated.  Needless to say, like many British apples, it does well in Cascadia.

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jafar
549 Posts
(Offline)
14
January 4, 2022 - 9:12 pm

@davem 

 

FYI, one of the apples from the old HP site is believed to be Roxbury Russet

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davem
297 Posts
(Offline)
15
January 5, 2022 - 8:25 am

jafar said
@davem 

 

FYI, one of the apples from the old HP site is believed to be Roxbury Russet

  

Yes, you mentioned that to me once before.  Until I updated my graft labels I didn't realize that I have grafts from all 3 trees.  I'll have to pay more attention to the fruit this year to see which one is the Roxbury.

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Crankyankee
Connecticut
78 Posts
(Offline)
16
January 6, 2022 - 7:13 am

Thanks for posting these various scion sources. I just ordered apricot scions from Bob Purvis from whom I got some very good cherry scions last year.

https://purvisnurseryandorchar.....cions.html

If anyone knows of a source for Tlor-tsiran apricot, either trees or scions, I'd be grateful to know. I ordered a tree from Raintree but they cancelled on account of their supplier cancelling on them.

Zone 6a in the moraines of eastern Connecticut.

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John S
PDX OR
2514 Posts
(Online)
17
January 6, 2022 - 8:09 am

any opinions on Roxbury Russet?

 

John S
PDX OR

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jafar
549 Posts
(Offline)
18
January 6, 2022 - 1:06 pm

Not bad.  Not as good as Golden Russet.

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brush
sw hills, portland, oregon
10 Posts
(Offline)
19
January 11, 2022 - 6:12 pm

hi folks,

i like the possibility of a local scion exchange, DIY style. or at least letting folks here know what we have available to swap. 

here is the list of what we currently have on site -- note that apples, pears, plums, and medlars are mixed in the list (sorry, might fix later). we will be pruning all of these in coming weeks, so could keep a few sticks as requested.

---

 

Akane      
Ashmead's Kernel    
Asian plum (yellow)  
Belle de Boskoop    
Blakeney Red    
Bosc      
Bramley's Seedling (second rung)
Brandy Perry    
Breda Giant    
Brooks? Plum    
Brownlee's? Russet  
Bulmer's Norman    
Butt      
Calville Blanc d'Hiver  
Chisel Jersey    
Chojuro      
Clusters Perry    
Cox's Orange Pippin  
Cox's Orange Pippin (S trunk)
Dabinette    
Damson      
Desert King fig    
El Dorado    
Empire      
*Foxwhelp    
Ginger Gold    
Golden Delicious    
Golden Russet    
Goldrush      
Haralson      
Harrison      
*Harrison    
Hendre Huffcap    
Honeysweet    
Hosui      
Hudson's Golden Gem  
Imamura Aki    
Italian plum    
Jonagold      
Karmijn de Sonnaville  
Kidd's Red Orange    
Kikisui      
Kingston Black    
Kosui      
Liberty      
? Mackintosh child?  
Macrocarpa    
*Medaille d'Or    
Multnomah    
Orcas      
Prinlew      
Pristine (second rung, above)
Red Astrakhan    
Reine Claude d'Oullins  
Rescue Pear    
Seneca      
*Somerset Redstreak  
Somerset Redstreak  
Spitzenburg apple    
Stanley      
Stoke Red    
Suij      
Taynton's Squash    
Tompkin's King    
Virginia Crabapple    
Wickson      
*Wickson    
William's Pride    
Wolf River (same location as above)
Wynoochee Early    
Yakumo      
Yarlington Mill    
Yellow Huffcap    
Yellow Newtown Pippin  
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brush
sw hills, portland, oregon
10 Posts
(Offline)
20
January 11, 2022 - 6:15 pm

and here is a list of what i'm looking for!

what i am looking for most of all is female hardy kiwi. anyone have any that you could give us scions from?

secondly, looking for the following varieties if anyone has them:

apple:

  • Limbertwig Brushy Mt. 
  • Porters Perfection
  • Tremletts Bitter
  • Winesap Virginia
  • Winter Banana

pear:

Arlingham Squash

Aylton Red

BARNET (syn. Brown Thorn; Hedgehog) Edible. Early midseason harvest. Fruit small. Fallen fruits resemble baby hedgehogs!! Tree: rather compact growth; scab-resistant; early bearing.

Black Huff-cap

Brown Bess

Chaseley Green

Cheat-boy

Coppy Pear

Flakey Bark

GELBMOSTLER Common in Austria and northern Switzerland. Fruit medium to large, globular, astringent. Originated in 1700s.

GIN Late midseason harvest. Heavy, conspicuous spur systems on vigorous tree.

Green Horse

HELLEN'S EARLY AKA Sweet Huffcap. Pre-1700 from Gloucester/Hereford. Heavyily cropping, vigorous trees. Early September harvest; smallish green-yellow fruit. Medium acid perry pear. Self-sterile.

Holmer

Judge Amphlett

Longland

*Moorcroft

Newbridge

NORMANNISCHEN CIDERBIRNE Extensively grown in Normandy and Austria; esteemed for high quality perry. Fruits small, turbinate, greenish-yellow, russetted. Rather dry flesh. Originated in Normandy in 1913.

*Oldfield

Parsonage

Pine Pear

Red Longdon

RED PEAR English variety at least 400 years old. Vintage quality perry. Ripens late midseason. Tree: moderate vigor; wide crotch angles.Very early bearing.

*Rock

ROMANIAN PERRY Fruit small, yellow. Matures mid-September.

Teddington Green

THEILERSBIRNE Very old type from Switzerland.

THORN Antique variety, good quality for perry, dessert and cooking. Early midseason harvest. Not precocious. Scab susceptible. Grown also for dessert.

Thurston Red

Turner's Barn

White Bache

White Longland

White Squash

WINNAL'S LONGDON English perry pear first propagated about 1790. Midseason ripening. Scab resistant.

Yoking House

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davem
297 Posts
(Offline)
21
January 16, 2022 - 11:23 pm

I took the grape pruning class at the Home Orchard Education Center on Saturday.  After the class I picked up a handful of scions of the following varieties (with permission):

Allen
Brilliant
Bronx
Buffalo
Golden Muscat
Himrod
NY-48
Vanessa
Verdelet

I plan to graft them onto my vines, but I'll have a few extras of most of them.

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jafar
549 Posts
(Offline)
22
January 20, 2022 - 11:12 am

@davem 

Are your "Opal"n  seedlings?

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davem
297 Posts
(Offline)
23
January 20, 2022 - 11:47 am

jafar said
@davem 

Are your "Opal"n  seedlings?

  

Yes.  Ambrosia <n> are as well.  Probably all will be junk, but it is a fun hobby.

When I first saw and tasted Opal, it reminded me a lot of my Miss Jessamine seedling.  I thought "aha, I have found the apple that is the Miss Jessamine parent!" (since I forgot to write it down).  But upon researching the history of Opal, I found that it was first grown in 1999.  I planted my Miss Jessamine seedling around 1994, so apparently the parent was not Opal.

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jafar
549 Posts
(Offline)
24
January 21, 2022 - 9:28 am

markshancock said
I am new to grafting and live in the PNW (Portland Area).

Why do we need the HOS to do a local Scion Exchange?

Is all that is needed is a location?

  

Mark, anybody can host an exchange.  I would say that more is needed than a location, but there are many ways to skin a cat.

There were some things that made the HOS exchange special.

Most of the scions came from some big collections, like Nick Botner's enormous collection in Yoncalla, and the pear Germplasm Repository in Corvallis.  The selection was astounding.  And there were hundreds of volunteer hours put into each event, by dedicated enthusiasts, to make them as valuable and memorable as they were.

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John S
PDX OR
2514 Posts
(Online)
25
January 24, 2022 - 6:16 pm

This would be our time to hang out face to face, tell a few bad jokes, let people know what we're excited about, explain to people how to do complex orchard activities, graft your own tree, buy rootstock, talk to other very knowledgeable orchardists, hear what the "buzz"is going on in fruit growing.

John S
PDX OR

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markshancock
Oregon
16 Posts
(Offline)
26
January 24, 2022 - 11:52 pm

jafar said
 

Mark, anybody can host an exchange.  I would say that more is needed than a location, but there are many ways to skin a cat.

There were some things that made the HOS exchange special.

Most of the scions came from some big collections, like Nick Botner's enormous collection in Yoncalla, and the pear Germplasm Repository in Corvallis.  The selection was astounding.  And there were hundreds of volunteer hours put into each event, by dedicated enthusiasts, to make them as valuable and memorable as they were.

John S said
This would be our time to hang out face to face, tell a few bad jokes, let people know what we're excited about, explain to people how to do complex orchard activities, graft your own tree, buy rootstock, talk to other very knowledgeable orchardists, hear what the "buzz"is going on in fruit growing.

  

Sounds like a great time.  I hope I can attend some time in the future.

And, yes, I can imagine there was a lot of work involved.  I had no idea it was that big.  I have organized large events before it it can be a lot of work.  My wife does it all the time as that is part of her job.  I looked a bit into it and I just have too many irons in the fire to consider this right now.  Also COVID rules, restrictions, and controversy would make it even more difficult.

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Reinettes
Lewis Co., WA
370 Posts
(Offline)
27
January 26, 2022 - 3:34 pm

markshancock said:  

"I am new to grafting and live in the PNW (Portland Area).

Why do we need the HOS to do a local Scion Exchange?
Is all that is needed is a location?"

Mark -- I don't know where you lived before the Portland area, but --yes-- location often does have a lot to do with it.  Throughout the U.S. there are many different climate zones.  Thus there are varieties of apples (and other fruits) which perform GREAT in one area of the country due to its climate, and then there are other parts of the country where the same apples would NOT do well because of such things as higher humidity and hot summers, versus, say, the PNW where growing seasons may be shorter (especially in Cascadia, the west side of the Cascade Mtn Range), and there is a considerably lower number of accumulated heat units through the growing season which can make all the difference between whether an apple variety is able to fully ripen, or not.  In my area for example, it would be a fool's errand to grow 'Granny Smith' or 'Braeburn' (both popular apples of Australian origin) because the length of the growing season and the low number of heat units make it virtually impossible to ripen the fruits adequately before the autumn and winter shut down any reasonable maturation.  This is one of the reasons why, in my area, I am particularly interested in trialling apple cultivars that do well in Great Britain, which also has a similar climate to ours.

So, yes:  Location is often a very critical part of determining which varieties might do well in one's own area.  I hope this clarifies things a bit.  ...And in the Portland OR area you have more heat units than I have here. Cry ... Smile

Reinettes (Tim).

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jafar
549 Posts
(Offline)
28
February 3, 2022 - 6:17 pm

@markshancock 

The Agrarian Sharing Network puts on propagation fairs further South in the Willamette Valley, and they bring lots of material.

You can join their Facebook page and check it out.  Sounds like they'd be happy to help support folks who were serious about putting something on in the Portland area.

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markshancock
Oregon
16 Posts
(Offline)
29
February 4, 2022 - 11:40 am

jafar said
@markshancock 

The Agrarian Sharing Network puts on propagation fairs further South in the Willamette Valley, and they bring lots of material.

You can join their Facebook page and check it out.  Sounds like they'd be happy to help support folks who were serious about putting something on in the Portland area.

  

Thanks.  I see they have a planning meeting for it next week.  Do you know when and where it will likely be?

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jafar
549 Posts
(Offline)
30
February 5, 2022 - 12:56 pm

markshancock said

jafar said

@markshancock 

The Agrarian Sharing Network puts on propagation fairs further South in the Willamette Valley, and they bring lots of material.

You can join their Facebook page and check it out.  Sounds like they'd be happy to help support folks who were serious about putting something on in the Portland area.

  

Thanks.  I see they have a planning meeting for it next week.  Do you know when and where it will likely be?

  

No.  I'd suggest to look, and/or ask on their Facebook page.

BTW, I think they are planning a trip to the Germplasm Repository in Corvallis to collect scion and were looking for volunteers.  I know some folks have been disappointed that scions are less available from the repositories. Sometimes there are privileges for volunteers.

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markshancock
Oregon
16 Posts
(Offline)
31
February 7, 2022 - 9:46 am

I found the 2022 Spring Propagation Fairs SCHEDULE posted at https://agrariansharing.net/

I'm disappointed that there is nothing up in the Portland area. Everything is Eugene or further south.

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jafar
549 Posts
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32
February 7, 2022 - 12:48 pm

markshancock said
I found the 2022 Spring Propagation Fairs SCHEDULE posted at https://agrariansharing.net/

I'm disappointed that there is nothing up in the Portland area. Everything is Eugene or further south.

  

That's why I suggested that they'd likely be willing to provide support for a Portland area event, I was sharing that based on an exchange of posts with them, on Facebook.

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markshancock
Oregon
16 Posts
(Offline)
33
February 8, 2022 - 9:53 pm

jafar said
That's why I suggested that they'd likely be willing to provide support for a Portland area event, I was sharing that based on an exchange of posts with them, on Facebook.

  

I attended the ASN planning meeting tonight and they sound like a great group.

Mostly they are from around Eugene.  At this point they feel it is too late to add another sharing event.

I might still go down and join one of their events and meet some of the in person but with 2.5h each direction that is at least 5h in the car.

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jafar
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February 9, 2022 - 1:49 pm

Well done.  Way to show some initiative!  I agree, from the people I know associated with them, they must be a great group.

Getting down to Corvallis area should be a little easier.  Don't they have something closer than Eugene?

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cmullin
Philomath, OR
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February 9, 2022 - 4:27 pm

I live in Philomath, near Corvallis on a small farm with my wife. So and event in Corvallis would be welcome. Also the ASN is on facebook where I don't have an account.

 

According to the published meeting notes(I am not a member) there were just at the National Clonal Germplasm Repository in Corvallis for Pears, and are going to be at the North Willamette Research and Extension Center for grapes on the 17th. I have not been to one of there events, but it looks like they do stuff outside of Eugene. But as Mark motioned they are based around Eugene and most events are in that area. 

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markshancock
Oregon
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February 9, 2022 - 6:24 pm

cmullin said
According to the published meeting notes(I am not a member) there were just at the National Clonal Germplasm Repository in Corvallis for Pears, and are going to be at the North Willamette Research and Extension Center for grapes on the 17th. I have not been to one of there events, but it looks like they do stuff outside of Eugene. But as Mark motioned they are based around Eugene and most events are in that area.   

Yes, they discussed both of those events.  They are part of the process of collecting scionwood for the Propagation Fairs and they are (mostly) leadership supported events rather than public events as we are guests for those events and the harvesting requires specific pruning skills and trust.  The Propagation Fairs this year are all Eugen and south see https://springpropagationfair......ion-fairs/ for details.

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jafar
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February 10, 2022 - 9:59 pm

Thanks.  I didn't look at the details, because I knew I wouldn't even be going as far south as Salem.  If I had more time on my hands, and spaces, I would, and hope to in future years, especially if somebody doesn't get something going in the Portland area.

I'm probably 10 or 15 years away from having lots of free time.  Fortunately I have lots of stuff in the ground already.

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