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sthelens
1 Posts
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1
April 14, 2016 - 5:57 pm

I recently planted Long John and Seneca plums assuming they would pollinate each other. Further research has brought this into question and I'm looking for advice. I live near Portland Oregon and am looking for a variety that would pollinate both of these. Otherwise what is the best choice for each. Thanks.  

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Dubyadee
Puyallup, Washington, USA
237 Posts
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2
April 15, 2016 - 6:40 pm

Raintree Nursery has a bloom time/pollenizer chart on their website.  It says Seneca and Italian are compatible.  http://www.raintreenursery.com.....Plums.html

One website I found says Polly and Victory are good pollenizers for Longjohn.

Seneca and Longjohn are both from Cornell University and both have Italian in their parentage.  I would probably pick somehing other than Italian that blooms same time as Seneca.  You can see the list of Cornell fruit releases at this link: https://ecommons.cornell.edu/b.....sAllowed=y

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John S
PDX OR
2817 Posts
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3
April 16, 2016 - 12:00 am

Excellent response, Dubyadee.  Yes, I would use a chart (One Green World may have one, I think Burnt Ridge uses a chronological list).  Damson, mirabelle or some other type of Euro plum would also be my suggestion.
John S
PDX OR

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Viron
1400 Posts
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4
April 17, 2016 - 6:18 am

...it’s likely too late to procure viable scion wood, but if you could come up with a couple sticks of a likely pollinator for ‘next winter/ spring,’ you could graft a pollinizer limb onto either (or both) existing trees…  Videos for ‘top work grafting’ are all over.  

I had the hardest time matching pollination on my plum/ prune trees, so ended up grafting on such limbs.  It worked!  And, you get a limb or two of another variety ..without having planted an entirely new tree.  Just do some serious homework on a pollinating variety, or two, then equal homework on the topworking process.  Just a thought ~

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clatterside
2 Posts
(Offline)
5
March 5, 2024 - 9:05 pm

Viron said 
...it’s likely too late to procure viable scion wood, but if you could come up with a couple sticks of a likely pollinator for ‘next winter/ spring,’ you could graft a pollinizer limb onto either (or both) existing trees…  Videos for ‘top work grafting’ are all over. basket random

I had the hardest time matching pollination on my plum/ prune trees, so ended up grafting on such limbs.  It worked!  And, you get a limb or two of another variety ..without having planted an entirely new tree.  Just do some serious homework on a pollinating variety, or two, then equal homework on the topworking process.  Just a thought ~

  

But I'm worried that grafting will produce mutant plants.

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Chris M
Philomath, OR
147 Posts
(Offline)
6
March 5, 2024 - 9:10 pm

What do you mean by "mutant"?

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