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Orchard pests in 1898
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davem
360 Posts
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1
January 29, 2024 - 3:36 pm

Portland newspaper article from 1898. Codling moths have been here a long time.

FB_IMG_1706568246703.jpg

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John S
PDX OR
2834 Posts
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January 29, 2024 - 9:13 pm

That certainly adds some perspective.  It's not like the recent Oriental fruit fly that attacks blackberries in the summer.

John S
PDX OR

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davem
360 Posts
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January 30, 2024 - 12:29 am

I did some more digging on this.  Here is a map of the area in 1891.  I see that Mr. McMillen named a street after himself (originally "B St").  And just to the north, "Cherry St".  I like to think that is where the orchard was 🙂

1891:

1891McMillensAddition-1.jpg

1871:

1871-1.jpg

1874:

1874-1.jpg

1908:

1908-1.jpg

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Larry_G
187 Posts
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January 30, 2024 - 11:49 am

To review confusion between fruit flies,

(from above) "It's not like the recent Oriental fruit fly that attacks blackberries in the summer."

I cannot find any reference to this common-name insect (Bactrocera) hosting on any Rubus species, unlike

the Spotted-Wing Drosophila that is referred to commonly as an Asiatic Fruit Fly, and torments our caneberries in the summer.

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John S
PDX OR
2834 Posts
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5
February 1, 2024 - 7:29 am

Thanks for reminding me of the name, Spotted Wind Drosophila.  I assumed that SWD was the culprit on my blackberries. I have read about it attacking blackberries from others, but I have no way of absolutely confirming that it was the SWD instead of a different fruit fly.

John S
PDX OR

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Larry_G
187 Posts
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6
February 1, 2024 - 12:29 pm

Your assumption is very likely correct. the Oriental Fruit Fly (OFF) is large (housefly-size+) and showy like a hover fly.

SWD are tiny and brownish. I do infrequently get fruit flies in my vinegar traps that are not SWD, like one other fly per 1,000 SWD.

 

Getting back to orchard pests and Mr. McMillen, turns out he was a prominent Indian fighter of the times, and the Natives would have considered him

a pest with an orchard.

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