Menu Close
Avatar
Log In
Please consider registering
Guest
Forum Scope






Start typing a member's name above and it will auto-complete

Match



Forum Options



Min search length: 3 characters / Max search length: 84 characters

Register Lost password?
sp_TopicIcon
Gather scion wood
Avatar
John S
PDX OR
2593 Posts
(Offline)
1
December 25, 2019 - 9:31 pm

This is my annual call to gather your scion wood. Just make sure if it's stone fruit, quince, or something that is subject to a lot of disease, wait for a dry period to gather it.  I make this post to remind myself as much as you all.

John S
PDX OR

Avatar
Rooney
Vancouver SW Washington
684 Posts
(Offline)
2
December 26, 2019 - 10:54 am

More information by similar others: (click below)
from-crfg-dot-org-1.PNG

Attachments
Avatar
decanter2020
2 Posts
(Offline)
3
January 6, 2020 - 1:07 am

For apples, you will want to gather scion wood anytime now and put it in the fridge with moist towels (paper or blotter type paper) wrapped around the cut end and then placed in a plastic bag to keep that moisture in around the stems.

Stone fruits are indeed different since you want to try and catch the new buds about a month prior to bud out of your stock trees. (apple and pear tree scion wood lasts longer for me so I wait for the end of Feb. for stone fruit scion wood gathering)

You can always simply wait till just before bud-out and do your grafts then, you will just want to work fast since you will gather buds and graft them at that time.

I like to have bud grafts waiting for sap flow for as short a time period as possible, especially for stone fruit trees.

I hope that helps you out. Those grafting tools are sweet by the way, short learning curve, perfect cuts every time and they speed up the process because of that.

Avatar
Rooney
Vancouver SW Washington
684 Posts
(Offline)
4
January 6, 2020 - 12:00 pm

The second paragraph (decanter2020), Is your "stock trees" referring to potted stone fruit trees in a greenhouse?

This "second paragraph advice" seems a little confusing when nothing is indicated whether or if your scions are collected locally not knowing where your from? 

My post last week (above) links to another page that is published by experts in mild winter California, and therefore most opposite to interior Alaska winters where stone fruit, apples, aspens etc. all greenup at the same time in late spring and going the way of collecting scons there in late spring work equally well. 

Here in the mild winter valley we will see buds push on stone fruits from here going forwards, and pears and apples in another month when the game is "all over" for collecting stone fruit scionwood. Well almost all over. Some plum species tend to bud out almost as late as apple, but there is still the stress factors to the tree that must be taken into consideration due to the ramping up of bacterial gummosis disease.

I know this is a sticky rather difficult topic to address the many other issues of timing (eg. rain sponsors gummosis and stress in budwood) but before too long (in days) it will be game over collecting most species of stone fruit wood.

I have had my stone fruits stored in 27F (yes buds push at 36F and can be frozen to much lower temperatures) since the first of the year and as per my owl icon I am from here and know better having seen many a failed graft due to wrong scion handling. When I go to Alaska I will still be gathering scions from friends fruit trees of any kind in April and stored for one month prior to grafting them to other cherry, plum, and apples that are already growing out-doors stock trees.

https://www.gi.alaska.edu/alas.....ning-hills

By the way, Welcome!

Avatar
sweepbjames
NE Portland, OR Cully Neighborhood
212 Posts
(Offline)
5
January 8, 2020 - 2:06 pm

 Rooney Said:

Here in the mild winter valley we will see buds push on stone fruits from here going forwards, and pears and apples in another month when the game is "all over" for collecting stone fruit scionwood. Well almost all over. Some plum species tend to bud out almost as late as apple, but there is still the stress factors to the tree that must be taken into consideration due to the ramping up of bacterial gummosis disease.

I know this is a sticky rather difficult topic to address the many other issues of timing (eg. rain sponsors gummosis and stress in budwood) but before too long (in days) it will be game over collecting most species of stone fruit wood.

I have had my stone fruits stored in 27F (yes buds push at 36F and can be frozen to much lower temperatures) since the first of the year and as per my owl icon I am from here and know better having seen many a failed graft due to wrong scion handling. When I go to Alaska I will still be gathering scions from friends fruit trees of any kind in April and stored for one month prior to grafting them to other cherry, plum, and apples that are already growing out-doors stock trees.

Yep! Too late to think about scions from Plum Ume in inner NE Portland. Ume is the earliest I know of.

IMG_4510.jpgIMG_4511.jpg

Attachments
Avatar
sprout
3 Posts
(Offline)
6
January 15, 2020 - 1:25 pm

Just to clarify.  I collect stonefruits and quince during dry weather.  Then they go in a baggie with water?  Sorry, am I understanding this correctly?  

Avatar
Rooney
Vancouver SW Washington
684 Posts
(Offline)
7
January 15, 2020 - 7:30 pm

sprout, John S, idell & decanter2020 said or say:

"Just to clarify.  I collect stonefruits and quince during dry weather (for the sake of the tree).  Then they go in a baggie with water? (enough moisture & loss prevention of the scion).  Sorry, am I understanding this correctly? "

Sprout: I get your point and think and hope it's all straight now. 🙂

Avatar
sprout
3 Posts
(Offline)
8
January 16, 2020 - 11:41 am

Thanks Rooney for the fast response.  That makes total sense now.  I wasn't thinking about the tree side of the equation, just the scion wood.  

Avatar
Rooney
Vancouver SW Washington
684 Posts
(Offline)
9
January 16, 2020 - 6:26 pm

Glad it helped Sprout. Scions can actually dry some and then come spring can be rehydrated for a day prior to grafting by enclosing damp feeling peatmoss around scions. When the scions almost sink in pure water they are fully saturated and again ready to graft.

Forum Timezone: America/Los_Angeles
All RSSShow Stats
Administrators:
Idyllwild
Moderators:
John S
Marsha H
Viron
jafar
portlandian
Top Posters:
Rooney: 684
DanielW: 519
PlumFun: 495
Reinettes: 375
davem: 312
Dubyadee: 222
gkowen: 218
sweepbjames: 212
Larry_G: 151
quokka: 148
Newest Members:
lelandzeller37
jaredgooseberry
kelleelamond96
ermabarrenger0
eloise3572
odettecardin147
jedodowd18
woodrowkleiman
terriheathershaw
allenmartens8
Forum Stats:
Groups: 1
Forums: 4
Topics: 2811
Posts: 15714

 

Member Stats:
Guest Posters: 0
Members: 7099
Moderators: 5
Admins: 1
Most Users Ever Online: 232
Currently Online:
Guest(s) 11
Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)